The mirrors of the fair

THE MIRRORS OF THE FAIR.

Published in “El papel de la voz” nº1. Feb/March 2016.
Texts Nuria López / Salva García-Ripoll / Illustration Mar Suárez

The myth of the mirror comes from Ancient Greece. Narcissus, a very handsome young man of whom all the ladies were in love, rejected Ninfa’s love. Nemesis, the goddess of revenge, punished him for his conceit. He managed to fall in love with his own image reflected in a fountain and that love was so strong that, unable to get away from his ego, he ended up jumping into the water.

The concept of “copying” accompanies us from the beginning of our lives. Newborns imitate the gestures they see in adults as a symbol of intelligence, communication and empathy. Children at school learn by copying. The “Rubio booklets” were the great example, in which we copied letters, numbers, words and phrases. And certainly, the copy is part of learning, being the ideal way to evolve and train, becoming empirical beings.

Leonardo Da Vinci explained the concept of copy: “If you want to see if the general effect of your painting corresponds to the object copied from nature, take a mirror, placed in such a way as to reflect the real object, and then compare the reflection to your painting and look carefully if the subject of the two images correspond to each other. The mirror is not only an instrument of the painter… it is their teacher.”

If an Arts student learns several pictorial styles through the copying of masterpieces, that will generate a great variety of knowledge that will allow him in the future to create his own work through the deepening of internalized resources. Therefore, the path of learning through copying is very enriching in the project, and different sources of inspiration offer you promising results. New ideas are generated from this mixture of knowledge. And as the well-known publicist Roberto Dualibi would say, we can affirm that “if you copy from one, you shoot; if you copy from two, you adapt; and if you copy from three, you create”.

If an Arts student learns several pictorial styles through the copying of masterpieces, that will generate a great variety of knowledge that will allow him in the future to create his own work through the deepening of internalized resources. Therefore, the path of learning through copying is very enriching in the project, and different sources of inspiration offer you promising results. New ideas are generated from this mixture of knowledge. And as the well-known publicist Roberto Dualibi would say, we can affirm that “if you copy from one, you shoot; if you copy from two, you adapt; and if you copy from three, you create”.

This is how Martha Medeiros describes this lack of originality in creation through this poem: “Dies slowly / who does not travel, / who does not read, / who does not listen to music, / who does not find grace in himself.” Who is not capable of creating without reproducing what others have already done, falls into the trap of vulgarity and falsification.

Someone who copies another to enrich themselves is empty, lacks originality and own ideas and has nothing to tell. He usually arrives at this method as a merely aesthetic solution to profit from and cover the need of his ego. Jesus Quintero said: “Someone said that we are all great until we are seven or eight years old, but then we try to look like others, we look for mediocrity, and we achieve it almost all the time. Do not insist on being mediocre, if you can be great.”

A good original work full of content and meaning, feels as a reflection in the mirrors of the fair against the fraud practiced by a few.

2018-09-06T16:03:17+00:00